Friday, September 18, 2009

News From The World Of Science

I am not a scientist, nor do I play one on TV. The following was printed in our local newspaper yesterday. For some reason I cannot find the original article from the LA Times. I offer this for your perusal.

Physics beats scare tactics
Cell phones cannot give you cancer
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II
Los Angeles Times

In the most recent instance of the triumph of wishful thinking over basic physics, a "collaboration of international EMF activists" this month released a report repeating the tired argument that "cell phones cause brain tumors." Their evidence: Studies discrediting the link between cell phone radiation and tumors were funded by telecommunications companies, which deliberately excluded data that might have shown a link.

Many people probably first heard about the "risk" of cell phones when David Raynard, whose wife died of brain cancer, appeared on "Larry King Live" in 1993 to support his lawsuit claiming that the tumor had been caused by her cell phone. His evidence: "She held it against her head and talked on it all the time."

More recently, King hosted three neurosurgeons who said they would never place a cell phone against their head because of the risk. They may be good neurosurgeons, but apparently they flunked physics.


Read the rest of the article


2 comments:

CrankyBeach said...

Cancer occurs when cellular DNA is disrupted, producing mutant strands of DNA. That is true for carcinogens, viruses and radiation. All radiation is composed of photons, and the energy they contain depends on the wavelength of the radiation. Yellow light has a frequency of 5 x 1014 Hz and is not powerful enough to break DNA bonds. Otherwise, we would have to sit around in darkened rooms all the time.

The frequency of a typical cell phone is about 1 x 109 Hz, while that used in a household microwave oven is 2.45 x 1012 Hz. In other words, the radiation from a microwave oven packs only a thousandth of the energy of yellow light, while that from a cell phone packs a millionth of the energy. The energy of EMF radiation from power lines — also a bugaboo of the EMF activists — has a million-fold less energy than a cell phone.

That is nowhere near enough energy to break bonds in DNA. For a microwave oven, it would be like trying to cut barbed wire with plastic scissors. For a cell phone, it would be more like paper scissors. And for EMF from power lines, in the words of New Yorkers, fuhgeddaboutit.

And if that isn't enough, Danish researchers reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute in 2001 on a study of half a million cell phone users in that country, linking computerized records of cell phone use to cancer databases. The result: no detectable risk.

An editorial in the same journal by physicist Robert L. Park of the University of Maryland summarized the evidence against a potential link. Many other studies have found the same results — which is to be expected if the laws of physics do, in fact, hold in this universe.

And as for those YouTube videos purporting to show cell phones popping corn: They're fake. Cardo Systems, a manufacturer of Bluetooth headpieces for cell phones, has admitted that it created the videos to scare consumers and encourage them to buy its products. The effect was created by dropping popped corn on the table, then editing out the unpopped kernels.

Jeff D said...

"The frequency of a typical cell phone is about 1 x 109 Hz, while that used in a household microwave oven is 2.45 x 1012 Hz."

Typo here. We've got to be talking 10^9 hz and 10^12 hz. You can cook things at these frequencies. I once cooked a hot dog at about 2.8x10^6 hz. Frequency is not power. Wattage is power. That is what you need to look at. The above mentioned hot dog was cooked at about 75 watts. If you put your head in a microwave, it would disrupt your DNA considerably! But you wouldn't get cancer, because you'd be dead.

Of course, a cell phone does not have very much power. I'd suspect on the order of half a watt. Cell towers, on the other hand, emit a lot more. I am a bit concerned with the amount of RF pollution we have, with everything going wireless.

 
Template by simplebits.com
Major modifications by CrankyBeach
All original content copyright 2004-2016 CrankyBeach. All other content is given proper credit where known.